Let op: dit event wordt gegeven in het Engels.

Dialogical processes teach us to stay with ambiguity, discomfort, and uncertainty as a necessary and generative practice. In this workshop, we will explore together how we might create dialogical relationships and possibilities in our own contexts and lives.

The philosophy and reason behind creating this introductory program for Open Dialogue training is to move away from pathology-focused care and cultivating empowerment and community in the mental health field for both professionals and people with lived experience. To have more peer to peer support and an open conversation with the right tools that would support the individual and their families.

As a participant, you will:

  • Learn how to build relationships based on truth and trust
  • Practice being present with yourself and others
  • Explore how you listen and respond in dialogue
  • Use reflection in order to understand dynamics more fully
  • Expand your tolerance of uncertainty

What is Open Dialogue

Open Dialogue is a model of mental health care in which crisis and distress are addressed as meaningful, in conversation with the person in distress, their family and social connections.

Rather than trying to find or provide an immediate answer, Open Dialogue fosters curiosity and supports the network to find their own co-created understandings. The primary aim of professional involvement is to facilitate the dialogue, and in dialogue, the way forward is found.

Why Open Dialogue?

Dialogical practice can offer profound changes to how we listen and respond to each other. It is through dialogue that we understand the world around us; it is through dialogue that we find meaning. Dialogical processes teach us to stay with ambiguity, discomfort, and uncertainty as a necessary and generative practice.

This way of being can be used to improve relationships in both personal and professional life, to help negotiate conflicts, to influence organizational cultures from within, and to be with each other in times of uncertainty.

Why this workshop?

This workshop is offering a unique experiential taster of the therapeutic space of Open Dialogue for a variety of people with different backgrounds.

While Open Dialogue training typically targets mental health professionals and systems, therapists are invited, as well as community activists, facilitators and those of us living with distress in our personal connections and life. We will explore together how we might create those relationships and possibilities in our own contexts and lives.

In an effort to make dialogue practice more widely accessible, we are offering an experiential introductory workshop to Open Dialogue. In this workshop, you will discover how using dialogue can positively impact your life, both personally and professionally.

Like open dialogue, this workshop is also deliberately flexible to meet the needs of the group when we meet, on the day and in the moment.

What this is not:

This is not an introduction to the research and “manual” of Open Dialogue. We do not work with lectures or a lot of teaching material. Dialogical practice is learned through being in dialogue, and that is where we will primarily focus.

Program details:

Both days begin at 9:00 and end roughly at 18:00, with a 60 minute lunch break in the early afternoon. Highly trained and experienced course facilitators guide you through dialogue practices designed to create and deepen connection, with facilitated group conversation after each exercise to extract personal and group insights. We've developed this program to ensure that participants grasp the foundational practice of Open Dialogue, no matter their level of prior experience or training.

Day 1: Entering Into Dialogue

History and Idea of the Meeting

Addressing Hopes and Fears

Building the Network

Co-creating dialogue

Being-ness & With-ness

Values in Practice

Day 2: Using Dialogue

Dialogical challenges - when we move to monologue

Connection to your context

Envisioning a new world of connection

Closing the circle

Your facilitators:

Olga Runciman is the first and only psychologist in private practice in Denmark to specialise in extreme states (psychosis). She is an international trainer and speaker, writer, campaigner, and artist. She is a co-founder of the Danish Hearing Voices network and the new International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. She is a board member for a variety of organisations including Intervoice, Mad in America, The Danish Psychosocial Rehabilitation organisation and others. She has recently finished her three-year open dialog education as a family therapist. Olga views mental distress from a Postpsychiatric viewpoint and does not believe there is a correct way to frame madness. She believes in opening up spaces where other perspectives can assume a valid role and does not seek to find solutions within psychiatry. Instead, she advocates we should be moving beyond psychiatry, encouraging an acceptance that not all human problems can be grasped in a modernist technological manner.

Dr. Iseult Twamley is a Clinical Psychologist and Open Dialogue Trainer/Supervisor. She is Clinical Lead of the Irish Open Dialogue practice in West Cork as part of the Adult Mental Health Service. In the past decade, dialogical and social constructionist approaches to therapy have been her primary focuses, sparked by her participation in the first international Open Dialogue 3 Year Program where she earned her certification as an Open Dialogue trainer. She also has a background in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, Family Interventions, and Schema Therapy modalities. In addition to her clinical work, over the past fifteen years, Iseult has been a lecturer at a number of universities throughout the UK including University College London and the University of Cardiff. As a family member and trauma survivor herself, Iseult is passionate about approaches to mental health that address collaborative and co-productive practices. She advocates and continues to seek opportunities to hear and learn from non-professional sources of wisdom.

Interested in this event? Register now at this website.

Let op: dit event wordt gegeven in het Engels.

Dialogical processes teach us to stay with ambiguity, discomfort, and uncertainty as a necessary and generative practice. In this workshop, we will explore together how we might create dialogical relationships and possibilities in our own contexts and lives.

The philosophy and reason behind creating this introductory program for Open Dialogue training is to move away from pathology-focused care and cultivating empowerment and community in the mental health field for both professionals and people with lived experience. To have more peer to peer support and an open conversation with the right tools that would support the individual and their families.

As a participant, you will:

  • Learn how to build relationships based on truth and trust
  • Practice being present with yourself and others
  • Explore how you listen and respond in dialogue
  • Use reflection in order to understand dynamics more fully
  • Expand your tolerance of uncertainty

What is Open Dialogue

Open Dialogue is a model of mental health care in which crisis and distress are addressed as meaningful, in conversation with the person in distress, their family and social connections.

Rather than trying to find or provide an immediate answer, Open Dialogue fosters curiosity and supports the network to find their own co-created understandings. The primary aim of professional involvement is to facilitate the dialogue, and in dialogue, the way forward is found.

Why Open Dialogue?

Dialogical practice can offer profound changes to how we listen and respond to each other. It is through dialogue that we understand the world around us; it is through dialogue that we find meaning. Dialogical processes teach us to stay with ambiguity, discomfort, and uncertainty as a necessary and generative practice.

This way of being can be used to improve relationships in both personal and professional life, to help negotiate conflicts, to influence organizational cultures from within, and to be with each other in times of uncertainty.

Why this workshop?

This workshop is offering a unique experiential taster of the therapeutic space of Open Dialogue for a variety of people with different backgrounds.

While Open Dialogue training typically targets mental health professionals and systems, therapists are invited, as well as community activists, facilitators and those of us living with distress in our personal connections and life. We will explore together how we might create those relationships and possibilities in our own contexts and lives.

In an effort to make dialogue practice more widely accessible, we are offering an experiential introductory workshop to Open Dialogue. In this workshop, you will discover how using dialogue can positively impact your life, both personally and professionally.

Like open dialogue, this workshop is also deliberately flexible to meet the needs of the group when we meet, on the day and in the moment.

What this is not:

This is not an introduction to the research and “manual” of Open Dialogue. We do not work with lectures or a lot of teaching material. Dialogical practice is learned through being in dialogue, and that is where we will primarily focus.

Program details:

Both days begin at 9:00 and end roughly at 18:00, with a 60 minute lunch break in the early afternoon. Highly trained and experienced course facilitators guide you through dialogue practices designed to create and deepen connection, with facilitated group conversation after each exercise to extract personal and group insights. We’ve developed this program to ensure that participants grasp the foundational practice of Open Dialogue, no matter their level of prior experience or training.

Day 1: Entering Into Dialogue

History and Idea of the Meeting

Addressing Hopes and Fears

Building the Network

Co-creating dialogue

Being-ness & With-ness

Values in Practice

Day 2: Using Dialogue

Dialogical challenges – when we move to monologue

Connection to your context

Envisioning a new world of connection

Closing the circle

Your facilitators:

Olga Runciman is the first and only psychologist in private practice in Denmark to specialise in extreme states (psychosis). She is an international trainer and speaker, writer, campaigner, and artist. She is a co-founder of the Danish Hearing Voices network and the new International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. She is a board member for a variety of organisations including Intervoice, Mad in America, The Danish Psychosocial Rehabilitation organisation and others. She has recently finished her three-year open dialog education as a family therapist. Olga views mental distress from a Postpsychiatric viewpoint and does not believe there is a correct way to frame madness. She believes in opening up spaces where other perspectives can assume a valid role and does not seek to find solutions within psychiatry. Instead, she advocates we should be moving beyond psychiatry, encouraging an acceptance that not all human problems can be grasped in a modernist technological manner.

Dr. Iseult Twamley is a Clinical Psychologist and Open Dialogue Trainer/Supervisor. She is Clinical Lead of the Irish Open Dialogue practice in West Cork as part of the Adult Mental Health Service. In the past decade, dialogical and social constructionist approaches to therapy have been her primary focuses, sparked by her participation in the first international Open Dialogue 3 Year Program where she earned her certification as an Open Dialogue trainer. She also has a background in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, Family Interventions, and Schema Therapy modalities. In addition to her clinical work, over the past fifteen years, Iseult has been a lecturer at a number of universities throughout the UK including University College London and the University of Cardiff. As a family member and trauma survivor herself, Iseult is passionate about approaches to mental health that address collaborative and co-productive practices. She advocates and continues to seek opportunities to hear and learn from non-professional sources of wisdom.

Interested in this event? Register now at this website.